Detroit Reports one COVID Death on June 3

According to the State of Michigan, the total number of COVID cases in Michigan rose to 58,035  on June 3, an increase of 304 cases from the previous day. The daily total was equivalent to 581 cases per 100,000 people (Chart 4). Of those 304 cases, 140 were documented in Southeastern Michigan, which was equal to 41 percent of the new cases. In Chart 1 we show that the State total for the number of COVID cases on  June 1 was 57,516–a five-day rolling average. The five-day rolling average for the total number of COVID cases (Chart 1) reflects a smoother curve and adjusts for fluctuations in testing and/or the quality of reporting or failure to report.

Chart 2 shows that, based on the five-day rolling averages, the growth of new COVID cases in Southeastern Michigan has further flattened overall. On June 1 the number of cases in Detroit reached 11,039, the highest in the region, and Wayne County reported the second highest number of cases at 9,386. On June 1, the five-day rolling average for the number of COVID cases in Oakland County was 8,389, and Macomb County reported 6,703.

The City of Detroit had 1,649 COVID cases per 100,000 people as of June 3, a small increase from 1,645 the day before (Chart 3). This is based upon a reported increase of 23 new COVID cases, bringing the total number of COVID cases in Detroit to 11,091. Wayne County reported 878 cases per 100,000 people, and Oakland County had 670  cases per 100,000 people. These per capita rates were based upon 9,450 total cases for Wayne and for 8,425 Oakland. Macomb County reported 775 cases per 100,000 people, which is based upon 6,769 cases.

The daily data highlighted in these posts is from Michigan.gov/coronavirus, where data is updated daily at 3 p.m. Historical data were supplied from covidtracking.com, which republishes COVID data from the State. Additionally, the case totals do not reflect the number of people who have recovered, just those who have been infected.

Chart 4 shows that Detroit reported the highest number of daily cases, according to the five-day rolling average, at 32. However, Macomb County wasn’t far behind, reporting 31 new cases on June 1. Macomb County’s numbers slightly increased from the day prior while Detroit’s numbers decreased by 1.

On June 3, the per capita rate for the number of new daily COVID cases per 100,000 people was 3 for the State, which was equivalent to 304 new cases. This was an increase from the day before . Detroit also had a per capita rate of 3 on June 3, which was equivalent to 23 new COVID cases. Both Wayne and Macomb counties had higher per capita rates than Detroit and the State. On June 3, Macomb County reported 6 new COVID cases per 100,000 people and Wayne County reported 5 new COVID cases per 100,000 people. These rates were equivalent to 49 and 50 new cases, respectively. Oakland County had a per capita rate of 1, which was reflective of 13 new reported cases. Overall, 140 new COVID cases were reported in Southeastern Michigan on June 3. This is an increase of 94 new cases over the 43 new cases reported from the day prior.

In Chart 6, the five-day rolling average for the number of deaths in Michigan shows a continuing slow increase (a lagged number of 5,515 deaths, an increase of 33 deaths). The actual reported COVID-19 deaths on June 3 was 5,570, an increase of 17 deaths from the day prior. Of those 17  deaths, Southeastern Michigan accounted for 16 of them. While the number of new daily cases increased in Michigan on June 3 the number of new daily deaths did not. On the June 2 the state had reported 37 deaths. However, the State did not tack on additional COVID deaths discovered through death certificate comparisons as it did the day prior.

Chart 7 (a 5-day rolling average) portrays how Detroit continues to report the highest cumulative number of deaths at 1,376 on June 1. Wayne County had the second highest total at 1,090 on June 1.

The State of Michigan, along with Macomb and Oakland counties, were the only three in the data examined to experience a per capita increase in the total number of COVID deaths per 100,000 people on June 3. The State’s rate increased to 56 COVID deaths per 100,000 people, which was equivalent to 5,570 deaths (17 new deaths). Macomb County’s per capita rate increase by 1 to 90; Oakland County’s rate also increased by 1 to 80. These rates were equivalent to 826 and 1,003 total deaths, respectively. In Detroit, the per capita rate remained at 205 (representing 1,380 deaths) and in Wayne County there were 102 COVID deaths per 100,000 people (1,098 total deaths). Macomb County had the highest single day death count in Southeastern Michigan on June 3; 8 COVID deaths were reported. One death was reported in Detroit.

Chart 9, the five day rolling average of deaths,  shows the number of new statewide deaths increased by 1, to 33, on June 1. Furthermore, Chart 10 shows how the number of deaths in Southeastern Michigan remained stagnant, except for Wayne County. Wayne County reported 6 new deaths on June 1, which was a decline of 1 from the day prior. Both Wayne and Oakland counties reported 6 new deaths while Macomb County reported 7 new deaths, the highest daily total in the region. These numbers are based on five-day rolling averages.

On June 3, the fatality rates continued to remain fairly stagnant across the region and for the State. The most notable is the State now reporting a fatality rate of 9.6 percent for 16 days in a row.

One reason we may be seeing such high fatality rates in Michigan is due to the low testing rates. When only having-presumably-a lower of number confirmed COVID cases than is actually likely due to the limited availability of tests, the fatality rate appears higher because the base comparison is smaller than it might be.


As the numbers continue to decline compared to where they were two months ago or even weeks ago, hospitals are now accepting visitors, and restaurants are preparing to open. This, and much more, represents a shift in how the spread of the virus is being dealt with and that is because leaders believe numbers are low enough to allow such actions. Restrictions, such as wearing face masks and maintaining a six-foot distance, remain in force however.

New Michigan COVID Numbers Decline, Potential Impact of Holiday Weekend Yet to be Seen

According to the State of Michigan, the total number of COVID cases in Michigan rose to 57,731 on June 2, an increase of 199 cases from the previous day. The daily total was equivalent to 578 cases per 100,000 people (Chart 4). Of those 199 cases, 43 were documented in Southeastern Michigan, which was equal to 22 percent of the new cases. In Chart 1 we show that the State total for the number of COVID cases on May 31 was 57,233–a five-day rolling average. The five-day rolling average for the total number of COVID cases (Chart 1) reflects a smoother curve and adjusts for fluctuations in testing and/or the quality of reporting or failure to report.

Chart 2 shows that, based on the five-day rolling averages, the growth of new COVID cases in Southeastern Michigan has further flattened as new daily case numbers decline. On May 31 the number of cases in Detroit reached 11,007, the highest in the region, and Wayne County reported the second highest number of cases at 9,335. On May 31, the five-day rolling average for the number of COVID cases in Oakland County was 8,369, and Macomb County reported 6,672.

The City of Detroit had 1,645 COVID cases per 100,000 people as of June 2, a small increase from 1,644 the day before (Chart 3). This is based upon a reported increase of 17 new COVID cases, bringing the total number of COVID cases in Detroit to 11,068. Wayne County reported 873 cases per 100,000 people, and Oakland County had 669 cases per 100,000 people, the same as the day before. These per capita rates were based upon 9,400 total cases for Wayne and for 8,412 Oakland. Macomb County reported 769 cases per 100,000 people, which is based upon 6,720 cases.

The daily data highlighted in these posts is from Michigan.gov/coronavirus, where data is updated daily at 3 p.m. Historical data were supplied from covidtracking.com, which republishes COVID data from the State. Additionally, the case totals do not reflect the number of people who have recovered, just those who have been infected.

Chart 4 shows that Wayne County, among the units covered here, again reported the highest number of daily cases. On May 31 49 new cases were reported in Wayne County, a decrease from the day prior, and Detroit reported 33 new cases, also a decrease from the day prior. The numbers reported in this chart reflect a five-day rolling average.

On June 2, the per capita rate for the number of new daily COVID cases per 100,000 people was 2 for the State, which was equivalent to 199 new cases, increases from June 1. The State had a higher per capita rate compared to Detroit and all counties in Southeastern Michigan. Detroit, Macomb, Washtenaw and Wayne counties all reported a per capita rate of 1 per 100,000 people for the number of new COVID cases and the other counties in the region reported rates of 0. Detroit’s per capita rate of 1 was equal to 10 new COVID cases while Macomb County’s was equal to 13 new cases, Wayne County’s was equal to 12 new cases and Oakland County’s per capita rate of 0 was reflective of 0 new reported cases. Overall, 43 new COVID cases were reported in Southeastern Michigan on June 2. This is a decline from the day prior.

In Chart 6, the five-day rolling average for the number of deaths in Michigan shows a continuing slow increase (a lagged number of 5,482 deaths, an increase of 32 deaths). The actual reported COVID-19 deaths on June 2 was 5,533, an increase of 37 deaths from the day prior, 11 of which were tacked onto the daily total as a result of comparing death certificates with the COVID database. Furthermore, of those 37  deaths Southeastern Michigan accounted for 25 of them. The number of new deaths in Southeastern Michigan nearly doubled from the day prior but continue to remain much lower than even a few weeks ago.

Chart 7 (a 5-day rolling average) portrays how Detroit continues to report the highest cumulative number of deaths at 1,371 on May 31. Wayne County had the second highest total at 1,084 on May 31.

The per capita rate for the total number of COVID deaths increased by one for Detroit and Wayne, Oakland and Macomb counties. The rate for the other counties remained the same as the day prior. In Detroit the per capita rate increased to 205 (representing 1,380 deaths). In Wayne County there were 102 COVID deaths per 100,000 people (1,095 total deaths). In Oakland County there were 79 deaths per 100,000 people (999 total deaths), and in Macomb County there were 94  COVID deaths per 100,000 people (818 total). Wayne County had the highest single day death count in Southeastern Michigan on June 2; 7 COVID deaths were reported. The State of Michigan had 55 COVID deaths per 100,000 people, which was equal to 5,533 total deaths. The State’s per capita rate did not increase as the total number of new deaths only increased by 37.

Chart 9, the five day rolling average of deaths,  shows the number of new statewide deaths declined again, this time to 32 on May 31. Furthermore, Chart 10 shows how the number of deaths in Southeastern Michigan remained stagnant, except for Wayne County. Wayne County reported 7 new deaths on May 31, the highest in the region, and Detroit reported 6 new deaths. These numbers are based on five-day rolling averages.


While Michigan maintained a fatality rate of 9.6 percent for the 15th day in row, Detroit’s rose to 12.5 percent and Macomb County’s rose to 12.2 percent (the highest it has been) on June 2.

One reason we may be seeing such high fatality rates in Michigan is due to the low testing rates. When only having-presumably-a lower of number confirmed COVID cases than is actually likely due to the limited availability of tests, the fatality rate appears higher because the base comparison is smaller than it might be.

The data reported on June 2 shows that numbers continue to remain stagnant and/or decline. However, with the incubation time of the virus being up to 14 days we have yet to see if and what impact the holiday weekend had on the spread of the virus.

Michigan’s Stay-at-Home Order Lifted as Numbers Flatten

On June 1, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer lifted the Stay-at-Home Order and several restrictions for retail, restaurants and bars and other businesses because the State has seen a serious improvement in the number of new daily cases and deaths, meaning the curve has flattened.

According to the State of Michigan, the total number of COVID cases in Michigan rose to 57,532 on June 1, an increase of 135 cases from the previous day. The daily total was equivalent to 576 cases per 100,000 people (Chart 4). Of those 135 cases, 57 were documented in Southeastern Michigan, which was equal to 42 percent of the new cases. In Chart 1 we show that the State total for the number of COVID cases on May 30 was 56,890–a five-day rolling average. The five-day rolling average for the total number of COVID cases (Chart 1) reflects a smoother curve and adjusts for fluctuations in testing and/or the quality of reporting or failure to report.

Chart 2 shows that, based on the five-day rolling averages, the growth of new COVID cases in Southeastern Michigan continued to level off for the counties in the region, likely one of the many factors as to why Whitmer decided to moved forward in lifting the Stay-at-Home Order. On May 30, the number of cases in Detroit reached 10,974, the highest in the region, and Wayne County reported the second highest number of cases at 9,307. On May 30, the five-day rolling average for the number of COVID cases in Oakland County was 8,343, and Macomb County reported 6,646.

The City of Detroit had 1,644 COVID cases per 100,000 people as of June 1, an increase from 1,641 the day before (Chart 3). This is based upon a reported increase of 17 new COVID cases, bringing the total number of COVID cases in Detroit to 11,058. Wayne County reported 872 cases per 100,000 people, and Oakland County had 669 cases per 100,000 people. These per capita rates were based upon 9,388 total cases for Wayne and for 8,407 Oakland. Macomb County reported 767 cases per 100,000 people, which is based upon 6,707 cases.

The daily data highlighted in these posts is from Michigan.gov/coronavirus, where data is updated daily at 3 p.m. Historical data were supplied from covidtracking.com, which republishes COVID data from the State. Additionally, the case totals do not reflect the number of people who have recovered, just those who have been infected.

Chart 4 shows that Wayne County, among the units covered here, reported the highest number of daily cases at 52 on May 30 and Detroit reported 37 new cases. The numbers reported in this chart reflect a five-day rolling average.

On June 1, the per capita rate for the number of new daily COVID cases per 100,000 people was 1 for the State, which was equivalent to 135 new cases. The State’s June 1 per capita rate was a decrease from the day prior, which is when the number of new cases nearly doubled. Just as the State’s per capita rate dropped so did the City of Detroit’s. On May 31, Detroit reported 14 new COVID cases per 100,000 people, and on May 1 it reported a rate of 3. Detroit’s increased rate was equivalent to 17 new cases (Chart 5). Wayne County reported 1 new COVID case per 100,000 people, which was equivalent to 14 new cases. Oakland and Macomb counties also each reported per capita rates of 1 new case per 100,000 people on June 1, which were equivalent to 11 and 12 new cases, respectively. Overall, 57 new COVID cases were reported in Southeastern Michigan on June 1. This is a decline of 263 from the day prior.

In Chart 6, the five-day rolling average for the number of deaths in Michigan shows a continuing slow increase (a lagged number of 5,450 deaths, an increase of 36 deaths). The actual reported COVID-19 deaths on June 1 was 5,516, an increase of 25 deaths from the day prior. Of those 25 deaths Southeastern Michigan accounted for 12 of them.

Chart 7 (a 5-day rolling average) portrays how Detroit continues to report the highest cumulative number of deaths at 1,365 on May 30. Wayne County had the second highest total at 1,077 on May 30.

Chart 8 portrays the total number of COVID deaths per 100,000 people on June 1. The cumulative total of COVID deaths per 100,000 people remained the same for Detroit and all the counties in the region due to the small increases in the number of deaths, which totaled 12 for all of Southeastern Michigan. In Detroit the per capita rate remained at 204 (representing 1,375 deaths). In Wayne County there were 101 COVID deaths per 100,000 people (1,088 total deaths). In Oakland County there were 79 deaths per 100,000 people (988 total deaths), and in Macomb County there were 93 COVID deaths per 100,000 people (814 total). Macomb County had the highest single day death count in Southeastern Michigan on June 1; 4 COVID deaths were reported. The State of Michigan had 55 COVID deaths per 100,000 people, which was equal to 5,516 total deaths. The State’s per capita rate did increase by 1.

Chart 9, the five day rolling average of deaths,  shows the number of new statewide deaths declined to 36 on May 30. Furthermore, Chart 10 shows how the number of deaths in Southeastern Michigan declined. Detroit reported 6 daily COVID deaths, as did Wayne, Oakland and Macomb counties on May 30. The 6 daily deaths in each of those three counties and Detroit were the highest reported in the region. These numbers are based on five-day rolling averages.


The fatality rate trends continued in Southeastern Michigan on June 1 with the State reporting a fatality rate of 9.6 percent for two weeks straight, Detroit continuing to report a fatality rate of 12.4 percent and Macomb County reporting a fatality rate of 12.1 percent for another day.

One reason we may be seeing such high fatality rates in Michigan is due to the low testing rates. When only having-presumably-a lower of number confirmed COVID cases than is actually likely due to the limited availability of tests, the fatality rate appears higher because the base comparison is smaller than it might be.

Although the Stay-at-Home Order has been lifted and business restrictions have been loosened to the point where many can open with capacity limitations, there are still concerns of a second wave. This is why policies to wear masks inside and work from home when possible are still encouraged. We must find a balance to ensure the health and safety of our communities remain a priority while opening the economy.

Michigan COVID Numbers Nearly Double from Saturday to Sunday

According to the State of Michigan, the total number of COVID cases in Michigan rose to 56,621 on May 31, an increase of 513 cases from the previous day and a total increase of 776 cases over the weekend. The daily total was equivalent to 574 cases per 100,000 people (Chart 4). Of those 513 cases 320 were documented in Southeastern Michigan, showing that local cases totaled more than half of the new cases documented in the State on Sunday. In Chart 1 we show that the State total for the number of COVID cases on May 29 was 56,505–a five-day rolling average. The five-day rolling average for the total number of COVID cases (Chart 1) reflects a smoother curve and adjusts for fluctuations in testing and/or the quality of reporting or failure to report.

Chart 2 shows that, based on the five-day rolling averages, the growth of new COVID cases in Southeastern Michigan continued to level off for the counties in the region, but case numbers are growing faster in Detroit and Wayne County than their local counterparts. On May 29 the number of cases in Detroit reached 10,936, the highest in the region, and Wayne County reported the second highest number of cases at 9,254. On May 29, the five-day rolling average for the number of COVID cases in Oakland County was 8,313, and Macomb County reported 6,616.

The City of Detroit had 1,641 COVID cases per 100,000 people on May 31, an increase from 1,626 the day before (Chart 3). This is based upon a reported increase of 104 new COVID cases, bringing the total number of COVID cases in Detroit to 11,041. Wayne County reported 871 cases per 100,000 people, and Oakland County had 668 cases per 100,000 people. These per capita rates were based upon 9,374 total cases for Wayne and for 8,396 Oakland. Macomb County reported 771 cases per 100,000 people, which is based upon 6,695 cases.

The daily data highlighted in these posts is from Michigan.gov/coronavirus, where data is updated daily at 3 p.m. Historical data were supplied from covidtracking.com, which republishes COVID data from the State. Additionally, the case totals do not reflect the number of people who have recovered, just those who have been infected.

Chart 4 shows that Wayne County, among the units covered here, reported the highest number of daily cases at 53 on May 29, an increase from 46 new cases reported the day prior. Detroit reported 45 new cases on May 29. The numbers reported in this chart reflect a five-day rolling average.

On May 31 the per capita rate for the number of new daily COVID cases per 100,000 people was 5 for the State, which was equivalent to 513 new cases. The State’s May 31 per capita rate was an increase from the day prior; the number of new cases in the State reported between May 30 and May 31 nearly doubled. The City of Detroit’s rate also increased quite dramatically. On May 30 Detroit reported 1 new COVID case per 100,000 people and on May 31 it reported a rate of 15. Detroit’s increased rate was equivalent to 104 new cases (See Chart 5). Wayne County reported 5 new COVID cases per 100,000 people, which was equivalent to 52 new cases. Oakland County reported a per capita rate of 1 new case per 100,000 people on May 31, which was equivalent to 1 new case, and Macomb County reported a rate of 8, which was also equivalent to 71 new cases. Overall, 320 new COVID cases were reported in Southeastern Michigan on May 31. This is an increase of 264 from the day prior.

In Chart 6, the five-day rolling average for the number of deaths in Michigan shows a continuing slow increase (a lagged number of 5,413 deaths, an increase of 55 deaths). The actual reported COVID-19 deaths on May 31 was 5,491, an increase of 28 deaths from the day prior. Of those 28 deaths Southeastern Michigan accounted for 22 of them.

Chart 7 (a 5-day rolling average) portrays how Detroit continues to report the highest cumulative number of deaths at 1,360 on May 29. Wayne County had the second highest total at 1,071 on May 29.

Chart 8 portrays the total number of COVID deaths per 100,000 people on May 31. The cumulative total of COVID deaths per 100,000 people in Detroit was 204 (representing 1,374 deaths). In Wayne County there were 101 COVID deaths per 100,000 people (1,069 total deaths). In Oakland County there were 79 deaths per 100,000 people (988 total deaths) and in Macomb County there were 93 COVID deaths per 100,000 people (810 total). Macomb County had the highest single day death count in Southeastern Michigan on May 31; 8 COVID deaths were reported. The State of Michigan had 54 COVID deaths per 100,000 people, which was equal to 5,491 total deaths.

Chart 9, the five day rolling average of deaths,  shows the number of new statewide deaths remained at 45 for both May 28 and May 29, showing a stabilization in the number of deaths across the state. However, Chart 10 shows how the number of deaths in Southeastern Michigan have been increasing in recent days. Detroit reported 10 daily COVID deaths and Wayne County reported 9 on May 29. Detroit  had the highest number of new daily deaths reported in the region. On May 29, of the 45 new statewide deaths reported, 34 were reported out of Southeastern Michigan (based on the 5 day rolling averages). When comparing both Charts 9 and 10 we see that while overall the number of deaths statewide has decreased, and stabilized, Southeastern Michigan does account for majority of the deaths and small increases have been occurring locally, but not enough to have a large impact on the five-day rolling averages.

On May 31 Detroit reported a fatality rate of 12.4 percent, which has been a trend for several days now. The fatality rate in Macomb County increased to 12.1 percent, and the State continued to report a fatality rate of 9.6 percent for 13 days in a row.

One reason we may be seeing such high fatality rates in Michigan is due to the low testing rates. When only having-presumably-a lower of number confirmed COVID cases than is actually likely due to the limited availability of tests, the fatality rate appears higher because the base comparison is smaller than it might be.

On May 31 the number of new COVID cases in Michigan nearly doubled from the day prior, with Detroit having the highest number of new cases at 104. We do know that reporting of COVID data over the weekends can sometimes reflect lower numbers or delayed reporting from the local communities. We will continue to watch the number of new cases in the coming week to see if numbers decline, as they had been, or increase as reported on Sunday.

COVID Cases in Senior Facilities Bring Increases to Michigan, Wayne County

According to the State of Michigan, the total number of COVID cases in Michigan rose to 56,621 on May 29, an increase of 607 cases from the previous day. This total was equivalent to 561 cases per 100,000 people (Chart 4). Of those 607 cases 248 were documented in Southeastern Michigan. This means that of the new daily COVID cases, Southeastern Michigan accounted for 41 percent of them. These numbers again show that majority of the new cases being reported in Michigan are coming from outside of Southeastern Michigan. In Chart 1 we show that the State total for number of COVID cases on May 27 was 55,646. The five-day rolling average for the total number of COVID cases (Chart 1) reflects a smoother curve and adjusts for fluctuations in testing and/or the quality of reporting or failure to report.

Chart 2 shows that, based on the five-day rolling averages, the growth of new COVID cases in Southeastern Michigan continued to level off for the counties in the region. On May 27 the number of cases in Detroit reached 10,850, the highest in the region, and Wayne County reported the second highest number of cases at 9,156. On May 27, the five-day rolling average for the number of COVID cases in Oakland County was 8,264, and Macomb County reported 6,561.

The City of Detroit had reached 1,625 COVID cases per 100,000 people on May 29, an increase from the cumulative total of 1,621 the day before (Chart 3). This is based upon a reported increase of 26 new COVID cases, bringing the total number of COVID cases in Detroit to 10,929. Wayne County reported 864 cases per 100,000 people, and Oakland County had 661 cases per 100,000 people. These per capita rates were based upon 9,298 total cases for Wayne and for 8,311 Oakland. Macomb County reported 757 cases per 100,000 people, which is based upon 6,616 cases.

The daily data highlighted in these posts is from Michigan.gov/coronavirus, where data is updated daily at 3 p.m. Historical data were supplied from covidtracking.com, which republishes COVID data from the State. Additionally, the case totals do not reflect the number of people who have recovered, just those who have been infected.

Presenting the five day rolling averages chart 4 shows that Detroit, among the units covered here, reported the highest number of daily cases at 46 on May 27, a decrease of 5 from the day prior. Wayne County’s numbers more than doubled on May 27; it reported 21 new cases on May 26 and 45 new cases on May 27.

On May 29 the per capita rate for the number of new daily COVID cases per 100,000 people was 6 for the State, which was equivalent to 607 new cases. The State’s May 29 per capita rate was an increase from the day prior. The City of Detroit’s rate on the other hand decreased. On May 29 Detroit reported a per capita rate of 5 new COVID cases per 100,000 people, and on May 28 it reported a rate of 4. Detroit’s decreased rate was equivalent to 26 new cases. Wayne County reported 13 new COVID cases per 100,000 people, which was equivalent to 142 new cases. Wayne County’s rate increased by 10 from the day prior. Oakland County reported a per capita rate of 2 new cases per 100,000 people on May 29, which was equivalent to 30 new cases, and Macomb County reported a rate of 3, which was also equivalent to 30 new cases. Overall, 248 new COVID cases were reported in Southeastern Michigan on May 29. This is an increase of 120 from the day prior.


In Chart 6, the five-day rolling average for the number of deaths in Michigan shows a continuing slow increase (a lagged number of 5,324 deaths, an increase of 36 deaths). The actual reported COVID-19 on May 29 was 5,406, an increase of 34 deaths from the day prior. Of those 34 deaths Southeastern Michigan accounted for 27 of them.

Chart 7 (a 5-day rolling average) portrays how the total number of COVID deaths in Southeastern Michigan continues to increase at a much slower rate, with Detroit reporting the highest cumulative number of deaths at 1,340 on May 27. Wayne County had the second highest total at 1,054 on May 26.

Chart 8 portrays the total number of COVID deaths per 100,000 people on May 29. The cumulative total of COVID deaths per 100,000 people in Detroit was 202 (representing 1,356 deaths). In Wayne County there were 99 COVID deaths per 100,000 people (1,069 total deaths). In Oakland County there were 78 deaths per 100,000 people (975 total deaths) and in Macomb County there were 91 COVID deaths per 100,000 people (793 total). Wayne County had the highest single day death count in Southeastern Michigan on May 29; 10 COVID deaths were reported. The State of Michigan had 54 COVID deaths per 100,000 people, which was equal to 5,406 total deaths.

Chart 9, the five day rolling average of deaths,  shows the number of new statewide deaths increased by 6 from the day prior. On May 27 the State reported 36 COVID deaths. Chart 10 shows how the number of deaths in Southeastern Michigan are overall continuing to decrease. Detroit reported 6 daily COVID deaths,  as did Wayne County. Both Detroit and Wayne County also had the highest number of new daily deaths reported in the region. On May 27, of the 36 new statewide deaths reported, 21 were reported out of Southeastern Michigan (based on the 5 day rolling averages).

On May 29 Detroit reported a fatality rate of 12.4 percent, which has been consistent for several days now. The fatality rate in Macomb County increased back to 12 percent, and the State continued to report a fatality rate of 9.6 percent for 11 days in a row.

One reason we may be seeing such high fatality rates in Michigan is due to the low testing rates. When only having-presumably-a lower of number confirmed COVID cases than is actually likely due to the limited availability of tests, the fatality rate appears higher because the base comparison is smaller than it might be.

On May 29 we did see a slight jump in the number of new daily COVID cases in Michigan. Although majority of these numbers occurred outside of the Southeastern Michigan region, Wayne County did contribute 142 of those cases to the daily total. We do know that senior living facilities continue to be hot spots for the virus, and one in Wayne County has reported the highest number of cases in the State.

Daily COVID Numbers Continue to Decline in Michigan

According to the State of Michigan, the total number of COVID cases in Michigan rose to 56,014 on May 28, an increase of 406 cases from the previous day. This total was equivalent to 561 cases per 100,000 people (Chart 4). Of those 406 cases 128 were documented in Southeastern Michigan. This means that of the new daily COVID cases, Southeastern Michigan accounted for 32 percent of them. These numbers again show that majority of the new cases being reported in Michigan are coming from outside of Southeastern Michigan. In Chart 1 we show that the State total for number of COVID cases on May 26 was 55,257. The five-day rolling average for the total number of COVID cases (Chart 1) reflects a smoother curve and adjusts for fluctuations in testing and/or the quality of reporting or failure to report.

Chart 2 shows that, based on the five-day rolling averages, the growth of new COVID cases in Southeastern Michigan continued to level off for the counties in the region. On May 26 the number of cases in Detroit reached 10,804, the highest in the region, and Wayne County reported the second highest number of cases at 9,110. On May 26, the five-day rolling average for the number of COVID cases in Oakland County was 8,244, and Macomb County reported 6,537.

The City of Detroit had 1,621 COVID cases per 100,000 people on May 28, an increase from 1,616 the day before (Chart 3). This is based upon a reported increase of 31 new COVID cases, bringing the total number of COVID cases in Detroit to 10,903. Wayne County reported 850 cases per 100,000 people, and Oakland County had 658 cases per 100,000 people. These per capita rates were based upon 9,156 total cases for Wayne and for 8,281 Oakland. Macomb County reported 754 cases per 100,000 people, which is based upon 6,586 cases.

The daily data highlighted in these posts is from Michigan.gov/coronavirus, where data is updated daily at 3 p.m. Historical data were supplied from covidtracking.com, which republishes COVID data from the State. Additionally, the case totals do not reflect the number of people who have recovered, just those who have been infected.

Chart 4 shows that Detroit, among the units covered here, reported the highest number of daily cases at 51 on May 26, a decrease of 6 from the day prior. Wayne County’s numbers have been decreasing since May 21, reaching its lowest daily count of 21.

On May 28 the per capita rate for the number of new daily COVID cases per 100,000 people was 4 for the State, which was equivalent to 406 new cases. The State’s May 28 per capita rate was a decline from the day prior. The City of Detroit’s rate also decreased. On May 28 Detroit reported a per capita rate of 8 new COVID cases per 100,000 people and on May 28 it reported a rate of 5. Detroit’s decreased rate was equivalent to 31 new cases. Wayne County reported 3 new COVID cases per 100,000 people, which was equivalent to 29 new cases. Oakland County reported a per capita rate of 2 new case per 100,000 people on May 28, which was equivalent to 21 new cases, and Macomb County reported a rate of 3, which was also equivalent to 28 new cases. Overall, 128 new COVID cases were reported in Southeastern Michigan on May 28. This is an increase of 1 from the day prior.

In Chart 6, the five-day rolling average for the number of deaths in Michigan shows a continuing slow increase (a lagged number of 5,288 deaths, an increase of 30 deaths). The actual reported COVID-19 on May 28 was 5,372, an increase of 38 deaths from the day prior. Of those 38 deaths 17 were identified by reviewing death certificates and the COVID database and then tacked onto the daily total. Furthermore, of those 38 deaths Southeastern Michigan accounted for 20 of them.

Chart 7 (a 5-day rolling average) portrays how the total number of COVID deaths in Southeastern Michigan continues to increase at a much slower rate, with Detroit reporting the highest cumulative number of deaths at 1,334 on May 26. Wayne County had the second highest total at 1,048 on May 26.

Chart 8 portrays the total number of COVID deaths per 100,000 people on May 28, and for the first time in several days most of the per capita rates in Southeastern Michigan increased, but only minimally. The cumulative total of COVID deaths per 100,000 people in Detroit was 201 (representing 1,351 deaths). In Wayne County there were 98 COVID deaths per 100,000 people (1,059 total deaths). In Oakland County there were 77 deaths per 100,000 people (971 total deaths) and in Macomb County there were 90 COVID deaths per 100,000 people (787 total). Oakland County had the highest single day death count in Southeastern Michigan on May 28; 10 COVID deaths were reported. Wayne County did not report any new deaths. The State of Michigan had 53  COVID deaths per 100,000 people, which was equal to 5,372 total deaths.

Chart 9, the five day rolling average of deaths,  shows the number of new statewide deaths decreased by 5 from the day prior. On May 26 the State reported 30 COVID deaths. Chart 10 shows how the number of deaths in Southeastern Michigan are overall continuing to decrease. Detroit reported 5 daily COVID deaths, which was a decrease of 5 from the day prior. This was also the highest number of new daily deaths reported in the region. On May 26, of the 30 new statewide deaths reported, 16 were reported out of Southeastern Michigan (based on the 5 day rolling averages).


On May 28 Detroit reported a fatality rate of 12.4 percent, which was the same as the day prior. The fatality rate in Macomb County again decreased to 11.9 percent from 12 percent, and the State continued to report a fatality rate of 9.6 percent for 10 days in a row.

One reason we may be seeing such high fatality rates in Michigan is due to the low testing rates. When only having-presumably-a lower of number confirmed COVID cases than is actually likely due to the limited availability of tests, the fatality rate appears higher because the base comparison is smaller than it might be.

The State’s Chief Medical Executive said cases continue to decline in all regions of the State. This is something we have witnessed in Southeastern Michigan for the last seven weeks. Despite the decrease, Michigan continues to have the fourth highest number of cases in the Country, according to the New York Times.

New Michigan COVID Cases Increase by 500 on May 27

According to the State of Michigan, the total number of COVID cases in Michigan rose to 55,608 on May 27, an increase of 504 cases from the previous day. This total was equivalent to 557 cases per 100,000 people (Chart 4). Of those 504 cases 127 were documented in Southeastern Michigan. This means that of the new daily COVID cases Southeastern Michigan accounted for 25 percent of them. These numbers again show that majority of the new cases being reported in Michigan are coming from outside of Southeastern Michigan. In Chart 1 we show that the State total for number of COVID cases on May 25 was 54,927. The five-day rolling average for the total number of COVID cases (Chart 1) reflects a smoother curve and adjusts for fluctuations in testing and/or the quality of reporting or failure to report.

Chart 2 shows that, based on the five-day rolling averages, the growth of new COVID cases in Southeastern Michigan continued to level off for the counties in the region. On May 25 the number of cases in Detroit reached 10,752, the highest in the region, and Wayne County reported the second highest number of cases at 9,89. On May 25, the five-day rolling average for the number of COVID cases in Oakland County was 8,227, and Macomb County reported 6,517.

The City of Detroit had 1,616 COVID cases per 100,000 people on May 27, an increase from 1,608 the day before (Chart 3). This is based upon a reported increase of 54 new COVID cases, bringing the total number of COVID cases in Detroit to 10,872. Wayne County reported 848 cases per 100,000 people, and Oakland County had 657 cases per 100,000 people. These per capita rates were based upon 9,127 total cases for Wayne and for 6,558 Oakland. Macomb County reported 750 cases per 100,000 people, which is based upon 8,260 cases.

The daily data highlighted in these posts is from Michigan.gov/coronavirus, where data is updated daily at 3 p.m. Historical data were supplied from covidtracking.com, which republishes COVID data from the State. Additionally, the case totals do not reflect the number of people who have recovered, just those who have been infected.

Chart 4 shows that Detroit reported the highest number of daily cases at 57 on May 25, a increase of 5 from the day prior. While Detroit experienced a small increase the counties in the region either remained flat or experienced a small decrease. Wayne County’s numbers have been decreasing since May 21.

On May 27 the per capita rate for the number of new daily COVID cases per 100,000 people was 5 for the State, which was equivalent to 504 new cases. While the State’s per capita rate increased, as did Macomb and Oakland counties’, Detroit’s decreased. The City of Detroit’s rate decreased from 14 new COVID cases per 100,000 people on May 26 to a rate of 8 on May 27. Detroit’s decreased rate was equivalent to 54 new cases. Wayne County reported 2 new COVID cases per 100,000 people for the fourth day in a row, which was equivalent to 19 new cases. Oakland County reported a per capita rate of 2 new case per 100,000 people on May 27, which was equivalent to 20 new cases, and Macomb County reported a rate of 3, which was also equivalent to 30 new cases. Overall, 127 new COVID cases were reported in Southeastern Michigan on May 27. This is a decrease of 13 from the day prior.


In Chart 6, the five-day rolling average for the number of deaths in Michigan shows a continuing slow increase (a lagged number of 5,258 deaths, an increase of 35deaths). The actual reported COVID-19 on May 27 was 5,334, an increase of 68 deaths from the day prior. Of those 68 deaths 14 were identified by reviewing death certificates and the COVID database and then tacked onto the daily total. Furthermore, of those 68 deaths Southeastern Michigan accounted for 48 of them.

Chart 7 (a 5-day rolling average) portrays how the total number of COVID deaths in Southeastern Michigan continues to increase at a much slower rate, with Detroit reporting the highest cumulative number of deaths at 1,329 on May 25. Wayne County had the second highest total at 1,044 on May 25.

Chart 8 portrays the total number of COVID deaths per 100,000 people on May 27, and all the per capita rates in Southeastern Michigan remained the same for at least the third day in a row, showing that the number of new deaths are in fact stabilizing. The cumulative total of COVID deaths per 100,000 people in Detroit was 197 (representing 1,347 deaths). In Wayne County there were 97 COVID deaths per 100,000 people (1,059 total deaths-no increase from the day prior). In Oakland County there were 76 deaths per 100,000 people (961 total deaths) and in Macomb County there were 89 COVID deaths per 100,000 people (784 total). Detroit had the highest single day death count in Southeastern Michigan on May 27; 21 COVID deaths were reported. The State of Michigan had 53  COVID deaths per 100,000 people, which was equal to 55,608 total deaths. The per capita rate of 53 for the State was an increase of 1 from the day prior; this is the first time the rate increased in 5 days.

Chart 9, the five day rolling average of deaths,  shows the number of new statewide deaths increased by 8 from the day prior. On May 25 the State reported 35 COVID deaths. Chart 10 shows how the number of deaths in Southeastern Michigan have experienced minimal increases in the last day or two. Detroit reported 10 daily COVID deaths, which was a small increase from the day prior. This was also the highest number of new daily deaths reported in the region. On May 25, of the 35 new deaths reported 18 were reported out of Southeastern Michigan. These numbers are based on 5-day rolling averages.

On May 27 Detroit reported a fatality rate of 12.4 percent, which was a small increase from the day prior but a number the City has reported several times over the last week. The fatality rate in Macomb County again hit 12 percent, and the State continued to report a fatality rate of 9.6 percent for 9 days in a row.

One reason we may be seeing such high fatality rates in Michigan is due to the low testing rates. When only having-presumably-a lower of number confirmed COVID cases than is actually likely due to the limited availability of tests, the fatality rate appears higher because the base comparison is smaller than it might be.

The number of new cases COVID cases reported in Michigan did nearly doubled on May 27 after a lull over the holiday weekend. However, 75 percent of those new cases came out of areas other than Southeastern Michigan. As the holiday weekend gets farther away we will see have to see if the daily COVID numbers continue to increase or decline, as we all hope.

Michigan COVID Cases Now Above 55,000

According to the State of Michigan, the total number of COVID cases in Michigan rose to 55,104 on May 26, an increase of 223 cases from the previous day. This total was equivalent to 552 cases per 100,000 people (Chart 4). Of those 223 cases 141 were documented in Southeastern Michigan. This means that of the new daily COVID cases Southeastern Michigan accounted for 70 percent of them. This is the first time in over a week where most of the new COVID cases were concentrated in Southeastern Michigan, as opposed to other areas of the State. In Chart 1 we show that the State total for number of COVID cases on May 24 was 54,588. The five-day rolling average for the total number of COVID cases (Chart 1) reflects a smoother curve and adjusts for fluctuations in testing and/or the quality of reporting or failure to report.

Chart 2 shows that, based on the five-day rolling averages, the growth of new COVID cases in Southeastern Michigan continued to level off for the counties in the region, despite most of yesterday’s growth being concentrated in the region. On May 24 the number of cases in Detroit reached 10,695, the highest in the region, and Wayne County reported the second highest number of cases at 9,067. On May 24, the five-day rolling average for the number of COVID cases in Oakland County was 8,201, and Macomb County reported 6,494.

The City of Detroit had 1,608 COVID cases per 100,000 people on May 26, an increase from 1,595 the day before (Chart 3). This is based upon a reported increase of 91 new COVID cases, bringing the total number of COVID cases in Detroit to 10,818. Wayne County reported 846 cases per 100,000 people, and Oakland County had 655 cases per 100,000 people. These per capita rates were based upon 9,108 total cases for Wayne and 8,240 for Oakland. Macomb County reported 747 cases per 100,000 people, which is based upon 6,528 cases. With the exception of Detroit, all other entities only experienced minimal increases.

The daily data highlighted in these posts is from Michigan.gov/coronavirus, where data is updated daily at 3 p.m. Historical data were supplied from covidtracking.com, which republishes COVID data from the State. Additionally, the case totals do not reflect the number of people who have recovered, just those who have been infected.

Chart 4 shows that Detroit reported the highest number of daily cases at 52 on May 24, a increase of 6 from the day prior. While Detroit experienced a small increase the counties in the region either remained flat or experienced a small decrease.

On May 26 the per capita rate for the number of new daily COVID cases per 100,000 people was 2 for the State. The per capita rate was equivalent to 223 new cases. While the State’s per capita rate remained the same, the City of Detroit’s increased from 4 new COVID cases per 100,000 people on May 25 to a rate of 14 on May 26. Detroit’s increased rate was equivalent to 91 new cases. Wayne County reported 2 new COVID cases per 100,000 people for the third day in a row, which was equivalent to 19 new cases. Oakland County reported a per capita rate of 1 new case per 100,000 people on May 26, which was equivalent to 14 new cases, and Macomb County reported a rate of 1, which was also equivalent to 12 new cases. Overall, 141 new COVID cases were reported in Southeastern Michigan on May 26. This is an increase of 61 from the day prior.

In Chart 6, the five-day rolling average for the number of deaths in Michigan shows a continuing slow increase (a lagged number of 5,223 deaths, an increase of 27 deaths). The actual reported COVID-19 on May 26 was 5,266, an increase of 26 deaths from the day prior. Of those 26  additional deaths Southeastern Michigan accounted for 9 of them. While Southeastern Michigan accounted for most of the new cases on May 26, the region did not account for majority of the additional deaths in the State.

Chart 7 (a 5-day rolling average) portrays how the total number of COVID deaths in Southeastern Michigan continues to increase at a much slower rate, with Detroit reporting the highest cumulative number of deaths at 1,319 on May 24. Wayne County had the second highest total at 1,037 on May 24.

Chart 8 portrays the total number of COVID deaths per 100,000 people on May 26, and all the per capita rates in Southeastern Michigan and for the State remained the same as the previous day. For the entities in Southeastern Michigan this is the second or third day in a row the rates haven’t changed, showing that deaths are stabilizing and remaining at much lower numbers than a few weeks ago. The State of Michigan had 52 COVID deaths per 100,000 people, which was equal to 5,266 total deaths. The State has reported a per capita rate of 52 deaths for five days in a row now. The cumulative total of COVID deaths per 100,000 people in Detroit was 197 (representing 1,326 deaths). In Wayne County there were 97 COVID deaths per 100,000 people (1,042 total deaths-no increase from the day prior). In Oakland County there were 76 deaths per 100,000 people (958 total deaths) and in Macomb County there were 89 COVID deaths per 100,000 people (779 total). Detroit had the highest single day death count in Southeastern Michigan on May 26; 4 COVID deaths were reported.

Chart 9, the five day rolling average of deaths,  shows the number of new statewide deaths decreased by 9  from the day prior. On May 24 the State reported 27 COVID deaths. Chart 10 shows how the number of deaths in Southeastern Michigan have been either leveling off or decreasing. Detroit reported 6 daily COVID deaths, which was a decrease of 2 from the day prior, further confirming that the number of deaths, at least in areas of Southeastern Michigan, are continuing to decline. On May 24, of the 27 new deaths reported 16 were reported out of Southeastern Michigan. These numbers are based on 5-day rolling averages.


On May 26 Detroit reported a fatality rate of 12.2 percent, showing that while it is the highest rate in the region it has been maintaining at just above 12 percent since May 8. The fatality rate in Macomb County declined to 11.9 percent, and the State continued to report a fatality rate of 9.6 percent for 8 days in a row.

One reason we may be seeing such high fatality rates in Michigan is due to the low testing rates. When only having-presumably-a lower of number confirmed COVID cases than is actually likely due to the limited availability of tests, the fatality rate appears higher because the base comparison is smaller than it might be.

We continue to see lower case numbers and death numbers in Southeastern Michigan than we have in weeks. And, while this is a sign of encouragement, it is also increasing residents’ call to open the State. Gov. Whitmer extended the Stay-at-Home Order through June 12 last week, acknowledging we are seeing signs of improvement, but that we are not out of the woods yet. As economic frustrations grow, we must also remember the value of good health, for ourselves and others.

Michigan’s COVID Case, Death Numbers Drop

According to the State of Michigan, the total number of COVID cases in Michigan rose to 54,881 on May 25, an increase of 202 cases from the previous day. This total was equivalent to 550 cases per 100,000 people (Chart 4). Of those 202 cases 80 were documented in Southeastern Michigan. This means that of the new daily COVID cases Southeastern Michigan accounted for 40 percent of them, highlighting how most of the new cases continue to occur outside of the region. Additionally, in recent days, the number of new daily cases statewide has been decreasing. The amount reported on May 25 was the lowest reported since March 22 (a lower number was reported on May 4 but the State had technically difficulties in reporting the data that day). The five-day rolling average for the total number of COVID cases (Chart 1) reflects a smoother curve and adjusts for fluctuations in testing and/or the quality of reporting or failure to report.

Chart 2 shows that, based on the five-day rolling averages, the growth of new COVID cases in Southeastern Michigan continued to level off for the counties in the region. The flattening of the COVID growth curves in Southeastern Michigan also further supports how the increase of COVID cases is slowing in the region, with cases outside the region continuing to make up majority of the new daily COVID cases. On May 23 the number of cases in Detroit reached 10,643, the highest in the region, and Wayne County reported the second highest number of cases at 9,041. On May 23, the five-day rolling average for the number of COVID cases in Oakland County was 8,178, and Macomb County reported 6,472.

The City of Detroit had 1,595 COVID cases per 100,000 people on May 25, an increase from 1,591 the day before (Chart 3). This is based upon a reported increase of 28 new COVID cases, bringing the total number of COVID cases in Detroit to 10,727. Wayne County reported 844 cases per 100,000 people, and Oakland County had 654 cases per 100,000 people. These per capita rates were based upon 9,089 total cases for Wayne and 8,226 for Oakland. Macomb County reported 746 cases per 100,000 people, which is based upon 6,516 cases. All of these were minimal increases from the day prior.

The daily data highlighted in these posts is from Michigan.gov/coronavirus, where data is updated daily at 3 p.m. Historical data were supplied from covidtracking.com, which republishes COVID data from the State. Additionally, the case totals do not reflect the number of people who have recovered, just those who have been infected.

Chart 4 shows that Detroit reported the highest number of daily cases at 46 on May 23, a decrease of 10 from the day prior. Such decreases of new daily cases was mirrored throughout the region, showing how the overall of increase of new COVID cases in Southeastern Michigan is flattening and/or declining.

On May 25 the per capita rate for the number of new daily COVID cases per 100,000 people was 2 for the State. The per capita rate was equivalent to 202 new cases, the lowest that has been reported in weeks. The City of Detroit was the only government entity in the region to report a higher per capita rate for the number of new daily COVID cases per 100,000 people than the State. On May 25 Detroit reported a per capita rate of 4 new COVID cases per 100,000 people, which was equivalent to 28 new cases. Wayne County reported 2 new COVID cases per 100,000, which was equivalent to 17 new cases. Oakland County reported a per capita rate of 1 new cases per 100,000 people on May 25, which was equivalent to 11 new cases, and Macomb County reported a rate of 2, which was also equivalent to 17 new cases. Overall, 80 new COVID cases were reported in Southeastern Michigan on May 25. This is a decrease in the total number of daily COVID cases in Southeastern Michigan from the day prior.


In Chart 6, the five-day rolling average for the number of deaths in Michigan shows a continuing slow increase (a lagged number of 5,196 deaths, an increase of 36 deaths). The actual reported COVID-19 on May 25 was 5,240, an increase of 12 deaths from the day prior. Of those 12 additional deaths Southeastern Michigan accounted for 6 of them. The 12 deaths reported on May 25 is among the lowest daily count in the last two months.

Chart 7 (a 5-day rolling average) portrays how the total number of COVID deaths in Southeastern Michigan continues to increase at a much slower rate in recent days, with Detroit reporting the highest cumulative number of deaths at 1,313 on May 22. Wayne County had the second highest total at 1,032 on May 22.

Chart 8 portrays the total number of COVID deaths per 100,000 people on May 25, and all the per capita rates in Southeastern Michigan and for the State remained the same as the previous day. The State of Michigan had 52 COVID deaths per 100,000 people, which was equal to 5,240 total deaths. The State has reported a per capita rate of 52 deaths for four days in a row now. The cumulative total of COVID deaths per 100,000 people in Detroit was 197 (representing 1,322 deaths). In Wayne County there were 97 COVID deaths per 100,000 people (1,042 total deaths). In Oakland County there were 76 deaths per 100,000 people (955 total deaths-an increase of 0 from the day prior) and in Macomb County there were 89 COVID deaths per 100,000 people (778 total-an increase of 0 from the day prior). Wayne County had the highest single day death count in Southeastern Michigan on May 25; 3 COVID deaths were reported. Detroit and St. Clair County were the only other entities in the region to report new deaths and those were reported at 2 and 1, respectively.

Chart 9, the five day rolling average of deaths,  shows the number of new statewide deaths decreased by 6 from the day prior. On May 23 the State reported 36 COVID deaths. Chart 10 shows how the number of deaths in Southeastern Michigan have been either leveling off or decreasing. Detroit reported 8 daily COVID deaths, which was a decrease of 2 from the day prior, further confirming that the number of deaths, at least in areas of Southeastern Michigan, are continuing to decline. On May 23, of the 36 new deaths reported 24 were reported out of Southeastern Michigan. These numbers are based on 5-day rolling averages.

On May 25 Detroit reported a fatality rate of 12.4 percent, showing that while it is the highest rate in the region it has been maintaining at just above 12 percent since May 8. The fatality rate in Macomb County remained at 12 percent, and the State continued to report a fatality rate of 9.6 percent for a week straight.

One reason we may be seeing such high fatality rates in Michigan is due to the low testing rates. When only having-presumably-a lower of number confirmed COVID cases than is actually likely due to the limited availability of tests, the fatality rate appears higher because the base comparison is smaller than it might be.

On May 24 the lowest number of deaths (5) was reported since March 22 and on May 25 the lowest number of new cases was recorded (both excluding when the State had technical difficulties in uploading data on May 4). Such a low reports bring hope that the spread of the virus and the havoc it has wreaked on families across this State, country and world may be, at the very least, becoming more manageable. But, as the State slowly begins to open up we will see if the spread has truly slowed, which is dependent on people respecting orders such as wearing masks and social distancing.

COVID Case, Death Decline Doesn’t Mean We’re Out of the Woods Yet

According to the State of Michigan, the total number of COVID cases in Michigan rose to 53,913 on May 22, an increase of 403 cases from the previous day. This total was equivalent to 540 cases per 100,000 people (Chart 4). Of those 403 cases 123 were documented in Southeastern Michigan. This means that of the new daily COVID cases Southeastern Michigan accounted for 31 percent of them, highlighting how most of the new cases continue to occur outside of the region. The five-day rolling average for the total number of COVID cases (Chart 1) reflects a smoother curve and adjusts for fluctuations in testing and/or the quality of reporting or failure to report.

Chart 2 shows that, based on the five-day rolling averages, the growth of new COVID cases in Southeastern Michigan continued to level off for the counties in region. The flattening of the COVID growth curves in Southeastern Michigan also further supports how the increase of COVID cases is slowing in the region, with cases outside the region now making up majority of the new daily COVID cases. On May 20 the number of cases in Detroit reached 10,486, the highest in the region, and Wayne County reported the second highest number of cases at 8,913. On May 20, the five-day rolling average for the number of COVID cases in Oakland County was 8,100, and Macomb County reported 6,396.

The City of Detroit had 1,574 COVID cases per 100,000 people on May 22, an increase from 1,570 the day before (Chart 3). This is based upon a reported increase of 29 new COVID cases, bringing the total number of COVID cases in Detroit to 10,587. Wayne County reported 837 cases per 100,000 people, and Oakland County had 647 cases per 100,000 people. These per capita rates were based upon 9,015 total cases for Wayne and 8,131 for Oakland. Macomb County reported 737 cases per 100,000 people, which is based upon 6,445 cases.

The daily data highlighted in these posts is from Michigan.gov/coronavirus, where data is updated daily at 3 p.m. Historical data were supplied from covidtracking.com, which republishes COVID data from the State. Additionally, the case totals do not reflect the number of people who have recovered, just those who have been infected.

Chart 4 shows that Wayne County reported the highest number of daily cases at 60 on May 20, an increase of 2 daily cases from the day prior when it also had the highest number of daily cases. Though Wayne County increased,  this chart shows that daily case numbers throughout Southeastern Michigan continue to decline.

On May 22 the per capita rate for the number of new daily COVID cases per 100,000 people was 4 for the State; this was equivalent to 403 new cases. The number of new cases the State reported on May 22 was a decrease from the day before for the second day in a row. Monroe County was the only government entity in the region to report a higher per capita rate for the number of new daily COVID cases per 100,000 people than the State. On May 22 Monroe County reported a per capita rate of 9 new COVID cases per 100,000 people, which was equivalent to 13 new cases. Detroit reported the same per capita rate as the State at 4 new daily COVID cases per 100,000 people; this was equivalent to 29 new cases. Wayne County reported 3 new COVID cases per 100,000, which was equivalent to 35 new cases. Oakland County reported a per capita rate of 0.4 new case per 100,000 people, which was equivalent to 6 new cases, and Macomb County reported a rate of 3, which was also equivalent to 25 new cases. Overall, 123 new COVID cases were reported in Southeastern Michigan on May 22. This is a decrease in the total number of daily COVID cases in Southeastern Michigan from the day prior. Wayne County (including Detroit data) had 64 new COVID cases on May 22 while Kent County had an increase of 86 new cases.

In Chart 6, the five-day rolling average for the number of deaths in Michigan shows a continuing slow increase (a lagged number of 5,056 deaths, an increase of 53 deaths). The actual reported COVID-19 on May 22 was 5,158, an increase of 29 deaths from the day prior. Of those 29 additional deaths Southeastern Michigan accounted for 16 of them.

Chart 7 (a 5-day rolling average) portrays how the total number of COVID deaths in Southeastern Michigan continues to flatten, with Detroit reporting the highest cumulative number of deaths at 1,282 on May 20. Wayne County had the second highest total at 1002 on May 20.

Chart 8 portrays the total number of COVID deaths per 100,000 people on May 22, and only the per capita rates for the State and Monroe County increased, while the other per capita rates in Southeastern Michigan remained the same. The State of Michigan had 52 COVID deaths per 100,000 people, which was equal to 5,158 total deaths. In Monroe County the per capita rate rose to 12, which represents 19 total deaths. The cumulative total of COVID deaths per 100,000 people in Detroit was 193 (representing 1,299 deaths). In Wayne County there were 95 COVID deaths per 100,000 people (1,024 total deaths), in Oakland County there were 75 deaths per 100,000 people (945 total deaths), and in Macomb County there were 88 COVID deaths per 100,000 people (776 total). Wayne County had the highest single day death count in Southeastern Michigan on May 22; 6 COVID deaths were reported. No new deaths were reported in Livingston, Oakland and St. Clair counties.

Chart 9, the five day rolling average of deaths,  shows the number of new statewide deaths increased for the fourth day in a row. On May 20 the State reported 53 COVID deaths. Chart 10 shows how the number of deaths in Southeastern Michigan, except in Wayne County, have been either leveling off or decreasing. In Wayne County reported that cumulative deaths were 1,002 deaths an increase of 13 from the day prior. On May 20, Wayne County had the highest number of daily COVID deaths in the region. Detroit reported 9 daily COVID deaths, which was an increase of one from the day prior, further confirming that the number of deaths, at least in areas of Southeastern Michigan, are remaining stable and much lower than in previous weeks. On May 20, of the 53 new deaths reported 37 were reported out of Southeastern Michigan. These numbers are based on 5-day rolling averages.

On May 22 Detroit continued to report a fatality rate of 12.2 percent, showing while it is the highest rate in the region it has leveled off. The fatality rate in Macomb County remained at 12 percent, and the State continued to report a fatality rate of 9.6 percent.

One reason we may be seeing such high fatality rates in Michigan is due to the low testing rates. When only having-presumably-a lower of number confirmed COVID cases than is actually likely due to the limited availability of tests, the fatality rate appears higher because the base comparison is smaller than it might be.

The data from May 22 shows that the number of deaths in Southeastern Michigan continues to decline, as do the number of new COVID cases. This is something Gov. Gretchen Whitmer also confirmed in her Friday press conference when she extended the Stay-at-Home order through June 12. She acknowledged the growth of new cases and deaths are on the decline, but said we, as a State, are “not out of the woods yet.”